Personal stories

Personal stories

On this page you find a compilation of stories of the Repatriation and Departure Service (DT&V). The compilation was created to tell you about the human aspect of our work and to provide greater insight into the complex reality of foreign nationals, our work and our partners. The stories are based on the truth and fully anonymised, the years have been included by way of illustration for this reason.

Repatriated after two years

In early 2008, a man is placed in a foreign nationals Detention Centre. He is familiair with several different aliases since he has given different names and nationalities at different occasions. The man says that his name is Ian Smith, and that he comes from Zamunda. After several conversations with Ian Smith, I make an appointment with the embassy of Zamunda. Ian, the consul, and I have an interview in order for the consul to determine whether Ian is in fact from Zamunda. At the end of the interview, the consul says that Ian is not from Zamunda. I am not issued a replacement travel document for Ian and therefore he is not allowed to travel.

After several discussions with Ian, I start to suspect that Ian comes from Udongo, and is probably called John Johnson. I make another appointment, this time with the Udongan embassy.

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Removal of a multiple offender and undesirable foreign national after 15 years

After a preliminary investigation conducted by the Aliens Police lasting nearly three years, and an extended period in a foreign nationals Detention Centre under the VRIS (Aliens in Criminal Law) regime, a man who was a multiple offender from the start was removed to Magandi. The man had been in the Netherlands illegally since 1995. In 2002, he comes in contact with the criminal justice system. For years he has been a threat to the safety of The Hague, through armed robberies, theft, drug trafficking and dealing in stolen items. It seems Charles had been living in the Netherlands illegally all these years. As he has been convicted by a District Court, Charles must first serve his prison sentence before I can make the arrangements for his removal.

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The Western Desert

In 2009, the Raapas family, parents and five children, was placed at the Freedom-restricting Centre (VBL) in Ter Apel. The family had been in the Netherlands since 2002, and after having gone through various asylum and regular residency procedures which did not result in a residency status, they ultimately ended up at the VBL. After speaking with them for a year, the family is finally convinced that they really must leave the Netherlands because there is no future for them here. To show that they truly do want to leave, they have signed the application form for replacement travel documents, and the application procedure was submitted to the embassy of Rosonia. This is why I was so surprised when the family’s lawyer told me that the family has submitted a new application for a residence permit with the Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND), because they would like to stay in the Netherlands.

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Voluntary or forced

Jonas has a psychiatric history and is on strong medication. Three times a day, a nurse comes to the Freedom-restricting Centre (VBL) to make sure that he takes the right medication at the right time. In order to ensure that Jonas is well-cared for during his trip back to his home country, I must make sure that a nurse accompanies him on this trip, and that he has enough medication for the journey. Jonas’s medical care in Pumolia must also be sorted out. In January, I had an introductory interview with Jonas Delhi. Jonas wants to go back to Pumolia, but does not have any travel documents. I help Jonas fill out the application form for a replacement travel document. We are both hopeful that we will get this travel document quickly as he is also eager to return. I only have one week to make all of the arrangements because Jonas is scheduled to fly.

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We want to go back, but we can't

Mr and Ms Khan have been living in the Netherlands since 2001. Nicole Khan gave birth to her son Marco, in the Netherlands. Roy Khan is from Sonzola, and Nicole Khan is from Guadec. Although they got married in Guadec, it is not clear which nationality the son obtained at birth. The Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND) rejected the Khan family’s application for asylum. They must leave the Netherlands. I have read the file and make an appointment with the family to discuss their situation. During the meeting, it becomes clear that Roy and Nicole have given some thought about their future. They want to leave the Netherlands and are working on their departure. The embassy of Sonzola thinks that the legitimacy of the mixed religion marriage between Nicole and Roy will create problems for Nicole with her application for a residence permit in Sonzola. A mixed marriage is not socially accepted, and the son born from this marriage is considered an illegitimate child.

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Ju Pack is ill and wants to go home

Ju Pack entered the Netherlands in 1998, and remained here illegally until 2008. He earns money by working illegally in an Asian restaurant in Groningen. For two years now, my colleagues and I have had various interviews with Ju Pack. In spite of the fact that we tell him he cannot stay in the Netherlands, he does not make any effort to leave. I have completed the application forms for a replacement travel document and sent them to the embassy, yet I have not received an answer. When Ju Pack gets diagnosed with a serious illness he changes his mind. He wants to go home and be with his family.

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